NY Times Best Selling Author Sylvain Reynard on Poetry.

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NY Times Best Selling Author and my favorite enigma Sylvain Reynard was gracious enough to write a guest blog on poetry. If you aren’t familiar with Reynard’s books,you are missing out on riveting tales full of suffering, sex, love, faith, and redemption. You can find out more about SR and his work by going to http://sylvainreynard.com/ You can also find him in all his tweeting glory @sylvainreynard

This poet is a huge fan. You will be too.

Now I give you SR in his own words

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Many people avoid poetry.

Poetry usually brings to mind limericks, or schoolyard sing-songs, or angst-driven blank verse. But The Iliad and The Odyssey are poems. Dante’s The Divine Comedy is a poem.

Poetry is extremely flexible as a genre and like other arts it contributes something important to the human experience. Poetry can be a thing of beauty and a medium for reflecting on profound and sometimes unsettling truths.

When I wrote The Gabriel Series, I was inspired by the poetry of Dante, hoping to introduce the beauty of his art to a wider audience. Dante is not very well known anymore and few people read him outside of school or university.

In my new Florentine Series, I was inspired by the poet Apuleius’s account of the love affair between Cupid and Psyche. Again, this is a poem that is not very well known and infrequently read.

You can read the tale by starting here: http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/TheGoldenAssIV.htm#anchor_Toc347999726

Psyche was the youngest of three sisters and very beautiful. Her beauty was so great, it intimidated prospective suitors. Her older sisters quickly found husbands, while Psyche remained alone.

Her father feared that Psyche had been cursed by the gods and so he sought out an Oracle, who instructed him to deliver his daughter up to marry a great winged evil. In sorrow and despair, the father obeyed. Psyche went along with the Oracle’s instructions, proclaiming that her condemnation was the result of unbridled envy.

And then something surprising happened…

“…prompted by the sight of the evening star, Psyche retired to bed. Now, when night was well advanced, gentle whispers sounded in her ears, and all alone she feared for her virgin self, trembling and quivering, frightened most of what she knew nothing of. Her unknown husband had arrived and mounted the bed, and made Psyche his wife, departing swiftly before light fell. The servant-voices waiting in her chamber cared for the new bride no longer virgin. Things transpired thus for many a night, and through constant habit, as nature dictates, her new state accustomed her to its pleasures, and that sound of mysterious whispering consoled her solitude.”

Psyche was delivered up to someone, but far from treating her evilly, he treats her well. He gives her pleasure. He loves her body. But he only comes to her at night, so she has no idea who he is.

The oracle prophesied of a great winged evil, but her husband reveals himself as a tender, attentive lover, who truly cares for her. One evening, he speaks to her,

“Sweetest Psyche,” he said, “my dear wife, cruel Fortune threatens you with deadly danger, which I want you to guard against with utmost care. Your sisters think you dead and, troubled by this, they’ll soon come to the cliff-top. When they do, if you should chance to hear their lament, don’t answer or even look in their direction, or you’ll cause me the bitterest pain and bring utter ruin on yourself.”

Psyche subsequently is faced with a dilemma – should she trust her husband’s actions and how he treats her, or should she trust the judgments of her family and the Oracle.

Psyche knows what it is like to be judged on appearance alone, without regard to her character. Suitors shunned her, because she was thought to be too beautiful and too perfect – like a statue. In the poem, it looks as if she places all her trust in appearances as she strives to discover her husband’s identity, not trusting that his actions have revealed his true character.

But what would looking on his face reveal? Would it make his actions a lie? Psyche doesn’t stop to reflect on her husband’s nature. If he were truly monstrous, he’d treat her badly and not kindly. He loves her and brings her pleasure and she seems to enjoy his company, although she is plagued with doubt. Her doubt, however, reveals a fatal flaw in her character – she cannot trust her judgment of her husband based on his actions; she must judge him based on his appearances. This fatal flaw will be her undoing …

You can read the rest of the story through the link I posted above.

I deal with similar themes in “The Prince” and “The Raven,” and also the next book in the series “The Shadow.” The male and female leads find themselves in a situation where they end up having to trust one another’s characters rather than outward appearances. Indeed, the importance of having a good character is one of the themes of the novels, along with love, sex, hope, and redemption.

I welcome your comments on the myth of Cupid and Psyche and I hope that you will take time for beauty and poetry in your daily life. – SR

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Sylvain Reynard and The Snarky Narrator -A Tale of Doughnuts, Angels, and Egos.

NY Times best selling author and international man of mystery Sylvain Reynard dropped by the blog to answer reader’s questions.  Never one to stand on the sidelines and idly twiddle his thumbs, the Snarky Narrator, affectionately known as SN from the Gabreil’s Inferno Trilogy, made a surprise appearance. Prepare to swoon to the tune of two of the most fascinating men on the planet (at least according to SR’s angels). Enjoy.

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Questions for SR and SN

Submitted by Misty.

1. Snarky, is it true that in #the raven that William’s description was based on SR?
SN: This is the kind of propaganda SR is known for. In reality, William is much better looking.

2. SR, is it true you look like William in real life? 🙂 I remember an interview a long time ago where you said you wanted to write about vampires, is this book fulfilling that desire?

SR: Yes, The Florentine Series has been my chance to write about vampyres and I’ve really enjoyed writing them.

3. A lot of us love Raven Wood she is real and has a big heart, do you base your characters on people in your life or are they completely imagined?

SR: They’re imagined but I suppose in my imagination, they’re real.

Submitted by Ellie Totten

4. I have never heard of Selinsgrove, Pa. before and wondered the reason you chose this setting as the hometown of Gabriel and Julianne.

If you research apple production in the USA, you’ll discover Pennsylvania has many orchards and produces a lot of apples. So the choice began with the orchard ….

5. In Gabriel’s Redemption I enjoyed the part where Gabriel met his biological sister, Kelly. I loved her warm personality. Will you consider writing more about his new relationship with his biological family now that he and Julianne have Claire?

It’s possible …

6. I’m a Professor Picton fan and since you’ve stated she is in fact a real person, can you share any information about her?

I can’t say too much but in one of my forthcoming novels, we’ll see more of her. Stay tuned …

This is for The SN.

7. Are you a bit put out that SR has ignored your charming personality in his new Florentine trilogy? In addition, would SR ever wear sneakers with his sexy argyle socks? Oh, and does SR have blue eyes like David Gandy? 😉

SN: I really don’t understand why everyone is so fascinated with SR and not with me. I’m far more attractive.

Submitted by Samia

8. Since a person can control many feelings, why do you think we can’t choose who we love?

Some elements of love can’t be controlled. That said, one could habituate oneself to loving a particular person through an act of will. But I suppose the better question is if we’re talking about romantic love, why would one want to?

9. If you had one wish, whatever you wanted, what would you wish for?

World peace. And more doughnuts.

Submitted by BAE


10. Hi, SR. Always good to see you. I’ve always wondered if you have ever been in a situation where people around you are commenting about your books next to you without knowing you’re the author. And for some reason, I could see you sneaking into a book store into the romance novels section out of curiosity (well, I would do it … 😉 Has it happened to you? If so, how was it? Do you mind to share?

Truthfully, I haven’t been in a situation where I’ve heard others discussing my books. But yes, when I’m in a bookstore I browse around looking to see where my books are shelved …

11. You’re well known for pleasing your readers. We all adore you. Your positivity influences our daily lives and give hope in moments when any of us might feel completely hopeless. What lessons or words of wisdom have you learned from your readers that have had a positive impact in your life?

I’m not sure I could identify just one but I can say that I enjoy hearing from readers through email and social media and there are many inspiring messages that they’ve shared with me.

For Snarky:

12. My dear & sexy SN… Where have you been? When will we have the pleasure to have another chat with you? We had to start a pacific protest in Twitter to have the opportunity to chat with you today. Is SR treating you well? I miss you. xo

SN: Thank you. I’ve decided I need to take control and narrate my own life…

Submitted by Renata

13. Your books contain great content about works of art of all kinds and shapes. For you, what is the beauty?! The concept of beauty evolves as man evolves?!

I think beauty is an aspect of goodness that incites a reaction in the observer.

14. The language of art and music seem to be universal. Your books bring music and characters who learn to speak foreign languages. Do you think that learning foreign languages ​​is a way to promote a sense of unity in humanity?

Absolutely.

15. For SN I would like you to know that you have many fans in Brazil, for its charm and wonderful sense of humor, including me. And after that, I wonder: “You do not feel trapped, confined between the “parentheses” of SR books?!”

SN: Yes, as I said in a previous answer, I need to take control and narrate my own life. I think I could do so very well in Brazil …

Submitted by Andarta

16. Hi SR, I’m not sure if you are familiar with The Time Traveler’s Wife movie (or book), the male character, as the title says, can travel through time and interact with himself in different periods of his life. If you could do the same thing, which advice you would give for a younger and older self of yours 🙂

That’s a good question. I don’t know the film or the book but I understand what you’re saying. For the younger: Be bold. For the older: Be patient.

17. Hi Snarky, always good to see you and read your comments in SR’s new paranormal series books 🙂 I’m not sure if SR told you, but we are discussing with Brazilian readers The Prince & The Raven. And, I’m afraid they don’t know you very well. If SR allows you to visit Brazil one day what do you want see or visit? Any message you to send to them? 🙂 P.S. Brazilian readers loved your “filisteu” comment in chapter 1 #ThePrince 😉

SN: Please thank all the Brazilian readers and say “Bom Dia” from me. I’d like to move to Brazil and get to know the readers personally …

Submitted by Alexandra

18. Will we ever see a picture of you?

SN: Absolutely. When I move to Brazil, I hope to have my picture taken with readers while on the beach …

Word association for SR from Kez

* icecream – chocolate
* (sugarfree) gummybears – pain
* Dr Seuss – Green Eggs and Ham

All the best, and happy reading!
-SR

Find more on this dynamic snarky duo at:
http://sylvainreynard.com/

Excerpt from THE PRINCE by Sylvain Reynard on sale 1/20/15

THE PRINCE by Sylvain Reynard

“The unveiling of a set of priceless illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy at the Uffizi Gallery exposes the unsuspecting Professor Gabriel Emerson and his beloved wife, Julianne, to a mysterious and dangerous enemy.

Unbeknownst to the Professor, the illustrations he secretly acquired years ago were stolen a century earlier from the ruler of Florence’s underworld. Now one of the most dangerous beings in Italy is determined to reclaim his prized artwork and exact revenge on the Emersons, but not before he uncovers something disturbing about Julianne …

Set in the city of Florence, “The Prince” is a prequel novella to “The Raven,” which is the first book in the new Florentine Series Trilogy by Sylvain Reynard.

“The Prince” can be read as a standalone but readers of The Gabriel Series may be curious about the connection between The Professor’s world and the dark, secret underworld of “The Prince”

See my review here.
https://laliterati.com/2015/01/09/the-prince-by-sylvain-reynard-a-review/
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Excerpt from THE PRINCE

In the distance, the Prince could hear voices and muffled sounds.

He approached silently, almost floating across the floor.

Desperate groans and the rustling of fabric filled his ears, along with the twin sounds of rapidly beating hearts. He could smell their scents, the aromas heightened due to their sexual arousal.

He growled in reaction.

The corridor was shrouded in darkness but the Prince could see that the professor had his wife up against a window between two statues, her legs wrapped around his waist.

Her voice was breathy as she spoke, but the Prince tuned out her words, moving closer so he could catch a glimpse of her lovely face.

At the sight of it, flushed with passion, his old heart quickened and he felt the stirrings of arousal.

It was not his custom to observe rather than participate. But on this occasion, he decided to make an exception. Careful to remain in the darkness, he moved to the wall opposite the couple.

The woman squirmed in her lover’s arms, her high heels catching on his tuxedo jacket. Her fingers flew to his neck, undoing his bow tie and tossing it carelessly to the floor.

She unbuttoned his shirt, and her mouth moved to his chest, as murmurs of pleasure escaped his lips.

The Prince felt more than desire as he watched the woman’s eager movements. He caught a glimpse of her exquisite mouth and the toss of her long hair that would no doubt feel like silk between his fingers.

She lifted her head to smile at the man who held her close and he could see love in her eyes.

THE PRINCE – Novella – 1/20/15 – InterMix

BN:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-prince-sylvain-reynard/1120399274?ean=9780698192065

​Amazon:

Amazon UK:

Amazon Canada:

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-prince/id922369900?mt=11

​The Raven – Book One of The Florentine Series 2/3/15

BN
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-raven-sylvain-reynard/1119619658?ean=9780425266496

Amazon

Amazon Canada

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-raven/id888019240?mt=11

SR’s links

The Florentine Series FB Page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Florentine-Series-Official/462002477277254?ref_type=bookmark​

​Website
http://www.sylvainreynard.com

Twitter
​www.twitter.com/sylvainreynard​

The Prince by Sylvain Reynard (a review)

The Prince is Sylvain Reynard’s novella that bridges the gap between his beloved Gabriel trilogy and his upcoming Florentine series. In the story, we are reunited with Gabriel and Julianne and introduced to a whole new set of enthralling characters. Notably, a mysterious and sinister other worldly being who wants the illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy that Gabriel acquired years ago. Unbeknownst to the professor, the illustrations were stolen. Now their rightful owner wants them back and is out for blood.

Reynard’s Prince is certainty no Prince Charming, even if he has the looks for it. No, he’s more of a Machiavelli prince, a master manipulator, ruthless with little regard for moral justification or the heads he might have to crush. The chasm between good and evil has never been so strongly felt. “It is better to be feared than loved.” Our dark antagonist embodies these words. However, I sense that there is more to The Prince than meets the eye. Perhaps, he wasn’t always so mercurial?

Reynard’s writing style is edgy and sexy. This novella oozes darkness and intrigue. I’m not normally a fan of the paranormal romance genre, but leave it to the sly fox to reel me in. Curse and bless you, Sylvain Reynard. I can’t wait to see what you have in store for us in The Raven.

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The Fox on The Run. Twenty Questions with NY Times Best Selling Author- Sylvain Reynard

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My thanks to SR. I apologizes for the formatting. WordPress is being cankerous. (GRR)

Randomness

1. If you were Alice, would you rather stay in Wonderland on the other side of the mirror, or come back to the real world to tell the tale?
Wonderland would be fascinating but I’d have to return to the real world.
2. Happiness is _____the satisfaction of all our deepest longings.

3. Can we have happiness without sadness? On occasion. But certainly not without marmalade.

4. An author with whom you would like to have lunch? Saul Bellow.

5. If you were a drink. What would you be? Why? A shot of Laphroaig Scotch. Neat.
I’m afraid the only answer to the ‘why’ question I can come up with is rather rude so I’d best leave it unanswered.
6. Once, the movie. Are you familiar with it?
No, I’m sorry to say.
7. Does darkness soothe you or frighten you?
Both. It depends on the kind of darkness and whether I’m carrying something that could be used as a defensive weapon.
8. If you ruled your own country, who would you get to write your national anthem?
JS Bach. Or Sting.
It’s a toss up, really.
9. What makes you nostalgic?
Classic children’s literature.
10. Narnia or Never Land?
Narnia.
11. Do you remember your dreams?
Yes. I dreamt of being a writer, once.
12. What’s your favorite time of day?
Morning, after I’ve had my first coffee.
13. What’s your favorite season?
Autumn.
14. Does pressure motivate you?
It can but it can also demotivate. So a balance needs to be struck. Speaking of which, when I lack demotivation, I turn to this helpful website: http://www.despair.com/demotivators.html
15. Would you rather live to write or write to live?
Live to write.
16. What published book do you secretly wish you had written?
The Brothers Karamazov.
17. Are you the paranoid type or calm, cool and collected?
Oh, I’m definitely paranoid. (Looks over shoulder)
Technically, one is not paranoid if there really are people who are trying to get you.
18. What would qualify as the afternoon of your dreams?
To spend the day in Florence at the Uffizi Gallery and then dine in a piazza.
19. Are you more like the sun or the moon?
Moon.
20. Do you hear voices?
Frequently.
They swear a lot.
Please tell our readers about your upcoming projects.

Thank you for inviting me to answer 20 questions and thanks for asking about my projects.

I have a new series coming out, which is set in the underworld of Florence. The first work, “The Prince,” is a novella that links the Gabriel Series with the new series. “The Prince” releases January 20th

http://www.amazon.com/Prince-Gabriels-Inferno-Florentine-Novella-ebook/dp/B00NUMIOY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415028778&sr=8-1&keywords=the+prince+sylvain+reynard

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Then “The Raven,” which is the first novel in the new series, releases February 3rd.

http://www.amazon.com/Raven-Florentine-Book-1-ebook/dp/B00KWG9JL8/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1415028884&sr=1-2&keywords=the+prince+sylvain+reynard

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