NY Times Best Selling Author Sylvain Reynard on Poetry.

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NY Times Best Selling Author and my favorite enigma Sylvain Reynard was gracious enough to write a guest blog on poetry. If you aren’t familiar with Reynard’s books,you are missing out on riveting tales full of suffering, sex, love, faith, and redemption. You can find out more about SR and his work by going to http://sylvainreynard.com/ You can also find him in all his tweeting glory @sylvainreynard

This poet is a huge fan. You will be too.

Now I give you SR in his own words

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Many people avoid poetry.

Poetry usually brings to mind limericks, or schoolyard sing-songs, or angst-driven blank verse. But The Iliad and The Odyssey are poems. Dante’s The Divine Comedy is a poem.

Poetry is extremely flexible as a genre and like other arts it contributes something important to the human experience. Poetry can be a thing of beauty and a medium for reflecting on profound and sometimes unsettling truths.

When I wrote The Gabriel Series, I was inspired by the poetry of Dante, hoping to introduce the beauty of his art to a wider audience. Dante is not very well known anymore and few people read him outside of school or university.

In my new Florentine Series, I was inspired by the poet Apuleius’s account of the love affair between Cupid and Psyche. Again, this is a poem that is not very well known and infrequently read.

You can read the tale by starting here: http://www.poetryintranslation.com/PITBR/Latin/TheGoldenAssIV.htm#anchor_Toc347999726

Psyche was the youngest of three sisters and very beautiful. Her beauty was so great, it intimidated prospective suitors. Her older sisters quickly found husbands, while Psyche remained alone.

Her father feared that Psyche had been cursed by the gods and so he sought out an Oracle, who instructed him to deliver his daughter up to marry a great winged evil. In sorrow and despair, the father obeyed. Psyche went along with the Oracle’s instructions, proclaiming that her condemnation was the result of unbridled envy.

And then something surprising happened…

“…prompted by the sight of the evening star, Psyche retired to bed. Now, when night was well advanced, gentle whispers sounded in her ears, and all alone she feared for her virgin self, trembling and quivering, frightened most of what she knew nothing of. Her unknown husband had arrived and mounted the bed, and made Psyche his wife, departing swiftly before light fell. The servant-voices waiting in her chamber cared for the new bride no longer virgin. Things transpired thus for many a night, and through constant habit, as nature dictates, her new state accustomed her to its pleasures, and that sound of mysterious whispering consoled her solitude.”

Psyche was delivered up to someone, but far from treating her evilly, he treats her well. He gives her pleasure. He loves her body. But he only comes to her at night, so she has no idea who he is.

The oracle prophesied of a great winged evil, but her husband reveals himself as a tender, attentive lover, who truly cares for her. One evening, he speaks to her,

“Sweetest Psyche,” he said, “my dear wife, cruel Fortune threatens you with deadly danger, which I want you to guard against with utmost care. Your sisters think you dead and, troubled by this, they’ll soon come to the cliff-top. When they do, if you should chance to hear their lament, don’t answer or even look in their direction, or you’ll cause me the bitterest pain and bring utter ruin on yourself.”

Psyche subsequently is faced with a dilemma – should she trust her husband’s actions and how he treats her, or should she trust the judgments of her family and the Oracle.

Psyche knows what it is like to be judged on appearance alone, without regard to her character. Suitors shunned her, because she was thought to be too beautiful and too perfect – like a statue. In the poem, it looks as if she places all her trust in appearances as she strives to discover her husband’s identity, not trusting that his actions have revealed his true character.

But what would looking on his face reveal? Would it make his actions a lie? Psyche doesn’t stop to reflect on her husband’s nature. If he were truly monstrous, he’d treat her badly and not kindly. He loves her and brings her pleasure and she seems to enjoy his company, although she is plagued with doubt. Her doubt, however, reveals a fatal flaw in her character – she cannot trust her judgment of her husband based on his actions; she must judge him based on his appearances. This fatal flaw will be her undoing …

You can read the rest of the story through the link I posted above.

I deal with similar themes in “The Prince” and “The Raven,” and also the next book in the series “The Shadow.” The male and female leads find themselves in a situation where they end up having to trust one another’s characters rather than outward appearances. Indeed, the importance of having a good character is one of the themes of the novels, along with love, sex, hope, and redemption.

I welcome your comments on the myth of Cupid and Psyche and I hope that you will take time for beauty and poetry in your daily life. – SR

Sylvain Reynard and The Snarky Narrator -A Tale of Doughnuts, Angels, and Egos.

NY Times best selling author and international man of mystery Sylvain Reynard dropped by the blog to answer reader’s questions.  Never one to stand on the sidelines and idly twiddle his thumbs, the Snarky Narrator, affectionately known as SN from the Gabreil’s Inferno Trilogy, made a surprise appearance. Prepare to swoon to the tune of two of the most fascinating men on the planet (at least according to SR’s angels). Enjoy.

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Questions for SR and SN

Submitted by Misty.

1. Snarky, is it true that in #the raven that William’s description was based on SR?
SN: This is the kind of propaganda SR is known for. In reality, William is much better looking.

2. SR, is it true you look like William in real life? 🙂 I remember an interview a long time ago where you said you wanted to write about vampires, is this book fulfilling that desire?

SR: Yes, The Florentine Series has been my chance to write about vampyres and I’ve really enjoyed writing them.

3. A lot of us love Raven Wood she is real and has a big heart, do you base your characters on people in your life or are they completely imagined?

SR: They’re imagined but I suppose in my imagination, they’re real.

Submitted by Ellie Totten

4. I have never heard of Selinsgrove, Pa. before and wondered the reason you chose this setting as the hometown of Gabriel and Julianne.

If you research apple production in the USA, you’ll discover Pennsylvania has many orchards and produces a lot of apples. So the choice began with the orchard ….

5. In Gabriel’s Redemption I enjoyed the part where Gabriel met his biological sister, Kelly. I loved her warm personality. Will you consider writing more about his new relationship with his biological family now that he and Julianne have Claire?

It’s possible …

6. I’m a Professor Picton fan and since you’ve stated she is in fact a real person, can you share any information about her?

I can’t say too much but in one of my forthcoming novels, we’ll see more of her. Stay tuned …

This is for The SN.

7. Are you a bit put out that SR has ignored your charming personality in his new Florentine trilogy? In addition, would SR ever wear sneakers with his sexy argyle socks? Oh, and does SR have blue eyes like David Gandy? 😉

SN: I really don’t understand why everyone is so fascinated with SR and not with me. I’m far more attractive.

Submitted by Samia

8. Since a person can control many feelings, why do you think we can’t choose who we love?

Some elements of love can’t be controlled. That said, one could habituate oneself to loving a particular person through an act of will. But I suppose the better question is if we’re talking about romantic love, why would one want to?

9. If you had one wish, whatever you wanted, what would you wish for?

World peace. And more doughnuts.

Submitted by BAE


10. Hi, SR. Always good to see you. I’ve always wondered if you have ever been in a situation where people around you are commenting about your books next to you without knowing you’re the author. And for some reason, I could see you sneaking into a book store into the romance novels section out of curiosity (well, I would do it … 😉 Has it happened to you? If so, how was it? Do you mind to share?

Truthfully, I haven’t been in a situation where I’ve heard others discussing my books. But yes, when I’m in a bookstore I browse around looking to see where my books are shelved …

11. You’re well known for pleasing your readers. We all adore you. Your positivity influences our daily lives and give hope in moments when any of us might feel completely hopeless. What lessons or words of wisdom have you learned from your readers that have had a positive impact in your life?

I’m not sure I could identify just one but I can say that I enjoy hearing from readers through email and social media and there are many inspiring messages that they’ve shared with me.

For Snarky:

12. My dear & sexy SN… Where have you been? When will we have the pleasure to have another chat with you? We had to start a pacific protest in Twitter to have the opportunity to chat with you today. Is SR treating you well? I miss you. xo

SN: Thank you. I’ve decided I need to take control and narrate my own life…

Submitted by Renata

13. Your books contain great content about works of art of all kinds and shapes. For you, what is the beauty?! The concept of beauty evolves as man evolves?!

I think beauty is an aspect of goodness that incites a reaction in the observer.

14. The language of art and music seem to be universal. Your books bring music and characters who learn to speak foreign languages. Do you think that learning foreign languages ​​is a way to promote a sense of unity in humanity?

Absolutely.

15. For SN I would like you to know that you have many fans in Brazil, for its charm and wonderful sense of humor, including me. And after that, I wonder: “You do not feel trapped, confined between the “parentheses” of SR books?!”

SN: Yes, as I said in a previous answer, I need to take control and narrate my own life. I think I could do so very well in Brazil …

Submitted by Andarta

16. Hi SR, I’m not sure if you are familiar with The Time Traveler’s Wife movie (or book), the male character, as the title says, can travel through time and interact with himself in different periods of his life. If you could do the same thing, which advice you would give for a younger and older self of yours 🙂

That’s a good question. I don’t know the film or the book but I understand what you’re saying. For the younger: Be bold. For the older: Be patient.

17. Hi Snarky, always good to see you and read your comments in SR’s new paranormal series books 🙂 I’m not sure if SR told you, but we are discussing with Brazilian readers The Prince & The Raven. And, I’m afraid they don’t know you very well. If SR allows you to visit Brazil one day what do you want see or visit? Any message you to send to them? 🙂 P.S. Brazilian readers loved your “filisteu” comment in chapter 1 #ThePrince 😉

SN: Please thank all the Brazilian readers and say “Bom Dia” from me. I’d like to move to Brazil and get to know the readers personally …

Submitted by Alexandra

18. Will we ever see a picture of you?

SN: Absolutely. When I move to Brazil, I hope to have my picture taken with readers while on the beach …

Word association for SR from Kez

* icecream – chocolate
* (sugarfree) gummybears – pain
* Dr Seuss – Green Eggs and Ham

All the best, and happy reading!
-SR

Find more on this dynamic snarky duo at:
http://sylvainreynard.com/

Love, Romance, Snarky Pants, Doughnuts, and Sylvain Reynard – NY Times Best-Selling Author

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My thanks to S.R. for his evasive but funny answers; I’m already plotting my next twenty questions. I’m coming for you, Foxy One.

1. Was Erich Fromm right…is love an art?

Hello Tosha. I agree with CS Lewis that there are different kinds of love. But yes, I think love is an art rather than a science.

2. First thought that comes to mind when I mention Le Baiser (The Kiss)

Desire.

3. Favorite love song?

Besame mucho.

4. What would constitute a perfect Valentine’s Day for you?

Perfection is to be found in the person of the beloved and in time spent together…

5. When did you last sing to yourself? To someone else?

In the shower this morning.

6. Have you ever used a cheesy pick up line? If so, what was it?

I plead the Fifth.

7. Backpacking or a luxury hotel?

It would depend on the location.

8. Is it easier to love or be loved?

I think the correct answer to these questions is “it depends.”

9. True romance is…….

I think a lot of ingredients go into this – the right person, time, attention, creativity, devotion, etc. Did I mention playfulness?

10. Favorite love poem?

i like my body by ee cummings.

11. What the most ridiculous thing you’ve ever done to impress a girl?

These questions are designed to embarrass me, aren’t they?

Tosha interjects: Yes! I need to work on my baiting skills.

12. What’s the Snarky Narrator up to this Valentine’s Day?

I try to remain ignorant of his romantic activities, but I think it’s safe to say he’s up to no good …

13. If you were a candy heart…..what message would be printed on you?

(Speechless)
Tosha so much for what the fox says. 😉

14. What do you get when you cross the soul with love and desire?

The culmination of what love is supposed to be.

15. What color patterns on argyle socks are best for seducing women?

Truthfully, Argyle is sufficient in itself, no matter the colour. Argyle is, as someone intelligent expressed, the very fabric of seduction.

16. Do you think Lipton Tea workers get coffee breaks? (random, I know)

I don’t, actually.

17. If you could be a woman for a day, how would you spend your time?

There’s no way to answer this question without sounding creepy.
Even that answer sounds creepy.
(sigh)

18 Tell us about your latest work The Raven.

Thank you.
“The Raven” is a paranormal romance set in Florence, Italy, which begins two years after the end of “The Prince.” It follows the character of Raven Wood, who is working as an art restorer at the Uffizi Gallery.
She is attacked one evening on her way home and wakes up days later with no memory of the incident. When she returns to work, she is stunned to discover that the Gallery has been robbed of a priceless set of illustrations by Botticelli, and the police want to question her …
Raven’s attempt to solve the mystery of the robbery and clear her name leads her to the underworld of Florence – a place that is inhabited by powerful and mysterious creatures, ruled by the dark and ruthless Prince…

20. Who would win in a doughnut eating contest, Gabriel or The Prince?

I think the correct answer is me.

——————————————————-
If you would like to keep up with the not so nefarious goings on of the always delightful S.R….
find him here:
http://sylvainreynard.com/

He’s also on Twitter working his magic
@sylvainreynard

Hia latest works:

THE PRINCE – Novella

BN:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-prince-sylvain-reynard/1120399274?ean=9780698192065

​Amazon:

Amazon UK:

Amazon Canada:

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-prince/id922369900?mt=11

​The Raven – Book One of The Florentine Series

BN
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-raven-sylvain-reynard/1119619658?ean=9780425266496

Amazon

Amazon Canada

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-raven/id888019240?mt=11

THE RAVEN by Sylvain Reynard (A Review) When Nevermore becomes Once More.

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The Raven.  Synopsis.

“Raven Wood spends her days at Florence’s Uffizi Gallery restoring fine works of Renaissance art. But an innocent walk home after an evening with friends changes her life forever. When she intervenes in the senseless beating of a homeless man, his attackers turn on her, dragging her into an alley. Raven is only semi-conscious when their assault is interrupted by a cacophony of growls followed by her attacker’s screams. Mercifully, she blacks out, but not before catching a glimpse of a shadowy figure who whispers to her…

Cassita vulneratus.

When Raven awakes, she is inexplicably changed. She returns to the Uffizi, but no one recognizes her, and more disturbingly, she discovers that she’s been absent an entire week. With no recollection of the events leading up to her disappearance, Raven also learns that her absence coincides with one of the largest robberies in Uffizi history – the theft of a set of priceless Botticelli illustrations. When the baffled police force identifies her as its prime suspect, Raven is desperate to clear her name. She seeks out one of Florence’s wealthiest and elusive men in an attempt to uncover the truth about her disappearance. Their encounter leads Raven to a dark underworld whose inhabitants kill to keep their secrets.

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Review 

Once in a great while a book comes along that you can’t put down. Sylvain Reynard’s The Raven is one of those books. I fell in like with Reynard’s literary prowess with his Gabriel’s Inferno trilogy; after reading The Raven, I can say I am head over heels, crazy, twerking in the street Miley style, Tom Cruise chair-jumping, forget that bass, Meghan Trainor is sure to be all about this novel, IN LOVE with this man’s prose. He has my undying book devotion until pen doth us part. The Raven is everything you could want in a good read: intelligent, witty, thrilling, sexy and hard to let go of. It’s the type of book you’ll spend all night reading and not feel guilty about it in the morning. You’l l even want to take it home to Mom. It’s hard to express how much I love this novel, but I will try.

Let’s dish about the heroine of the book, shall we? Raven Wood is strong, feisty, determined, witty and real. She has overcome adversaries with grace and lives a life of purpose. This woman knows how to make the proverbial lemonade out of lemons. She compassionate and brave, to use the vernacular, she is a total bad ass. In a book age where the romance genre is inundated with wimpy, subservient, spineless, superficial women, Raven is a breath of fresh girl power air. I love her.

Of course you can’t have a heroine without a hero, or in The Prince’s case antihero. He is very much an alpha, Byronic male but atypical in his otherworldly abilities. At first glance he seems mercurial, but underneath beats a tender but tormented heart. Still, he is a force to be reckoned with, but Raven is up to the task. Together, they are a formidable match. The chemistry between the two leaps off the pages.

Reynard, in signature style throws in literary, cultural, historic, art and aesthetic references. There’s a strong Machiavellian theme throughout the book and a huge nod to Cupid and Psyche. He’ll also have you clamoring to catch the next flight to Florence, Italy. The Florence Tourist Board owes him a commission. You’ll feel like you are taking the Renaissance Walk and touring the Uffizi Gallery. You’ll gain a new appreciation for the rich history of Florentine art. There are even analyses of a few of the great artworks of the Renaissance, deftly explaining them in terms of the religion and politics of the time.

Reynard took some creative risks with this novel and did it in an audaciously ambitious way. The dividends pay off. His style is terse but lyrical, bold and edgy Gritty and visceral. His voice is original and commanding. The novel manages the delightful tricks of being harrowing and romantic, suspenseful and intellectual. He effortlessly weaves in themes of justice, mercy, loss, hope, love, redemption and good old-fashioned fortitude of character. The Raven is a fearless and flawless read by a remarkable author.

Excerpt from The Raven 

In the distance, the Prince could hear voices and muffled sounds.

He approached silently, almost floating across the floor.

Desperate groans and the rustling of fabric filled his ears, along with the twin sounds of rapidly beating hearts. He could smell their scents, the aromas heightened due to their sexual arousal.

He growled in reaction.

The corridor was shrouded in darkness but the Prince could see that the professor had his wife up against a window between two statues, her legs wrapped around his waist.

Her voice was breathy as she spoke, but the Prince tuned out her words, moving closer so he could catch a glimpse of her lovely face.

At the sight of it, flushed with passion, his old heart quickened and he felt the stirrings of arousal.

It was not his custom to observe rather than participate. But on this occasion, he decided to make an exception. Careful to remain in the darkness, he moved to the wall opposite the couple.

The woman squirmed in her lover’s arms, her high heels catching on his tuxedo jacket. Her fingers flew to his neck, undoing his bow tie and tossing it carelessly to the floor.

She unbuttoned his shirt, and her mouth moved to his chest, as murmurs of pleasure escaped his lips.

The Prince felt more than desire as he watched the woman’s eager movements. He caught a glimpse of her exquisite mouth and the toss of her long hair that would no doubt feel like silk between his fingers.

She lifted her head to smile at the man who held her close and he could see love in her eyes.

___________________________________________________________________________

​The Raven – Book One of The Florentine Series 2/3/15

BN
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-raven-sylvain-reynard/1119619658?ean=9780425266496

Amazon

Amazon Canada

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-raven/id888019240?mt=11

Excerpt from THE PRINCE by Sylvain Reynard on sale 1/20/15

THE PRINCE by Sylvain Reynard

“The unveiling of a set of priceless illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy at the Uffizi Gallery exposes the unsuspecting Professor Gabriel Emerson and his beloved wife, Julianne, to a mysterious and dangerous enemy.

Unbeknownst to the Professor, the illustrations he secretly acquired years ago were stolen a century earlier from the ruler of Florence’s underworld. Now one of the most dangerous beings in Italy is determined to reclaim his prized artwork and exact revenge on the Emersons, but not before he uncovers something disturbing about Julianne …

Set in the city of Florence, “The Prince” is a prequel novella to “The Raven,” which is the first book in the new Florentine Series Trilogy by Sylvain Reynard.

“The Prince” can be read as a standalone but readers of The Gabriel Series may be curious about the connection between The Professor’s world and the dark, secret underworld of “The Prince”

See my review here.
https://laliterati.com/2015/01/09/the-prince-by-sylvain-reynard-a-review/
_________________________________________
Excerpt from THE PRINCE

In the distance, the Prince could hear voices and muffled sounds.

He approached silently, almost floating across the floor.

Desperate groans and the rustling of fabric filled his ears, along with the twin sounds of rapidly beating hearts. He could smell their scents, the aromas heightened due to their sexual arousal.

He growled in reaction.

The corridor was shrouded in darkness but the Prince could see that the professor had his wife up against a window between two statues, her legs wrapped around his waist.

Her voice was breathy as she spoke, but the Prince tuned out her words, moving closer so he could catch a glimpse of her lovely face.

At the sight of it, flushed with passion, his old heart quickened and he felt the stirrings of arousal.

It was not his custom to observe rather than participate. But on this occasion, he decided to make an exception. Careful to remain in the darkness, he moved to the wall opposite the couple.

The woman squirmed in her lover’s arms, her high heels catching on his tuxedo jacket. Her fingers flew to his neck, undoing his bow tie and tossing it carelessly to the floor.

She unbuttoned his shirt, and her mouth moved to his chest, as murmurs of pleasure escaped his lips.

The Prince felt more than desire as he watched the woman’s eager movements. He caught a glimpse of her exquisite mouth and the toss of her long hair that would no doubt feel like silk between his fingers.

She lifted her head to smile at the man who held her close and he could see love in her eyes.

THE PRINCE – Novella – 1/20/15 – InterMix

BN:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-prince-sylvain-reynard/1120399274?ean=9780698192065

​Amazon:

Amazon UK:

Amazon Canada:

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-prince/id922369900?mt=11

​The Raven – Book One of The Florentine Series 2/3/15

BN
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-raven-sylvain-reynard/1119619658?ean=9780425266496

Amazon

Amazon Canada

iTunes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-raven/id888019240?mt=11

SR’s links

The Florentine Series FB Page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Florentine-Series-Official/462002477277254?ref_type=bookmark​

​Website
http://www.sylvainreynard.com

Twitter
​www.twitter.com/sylvainreynard​

The Prince by Sylvain Reynard (a review)

The Prince is Sylvain Reynard’s novella that bridges the gap between his beloved Gabriel trilogy and his upcoming Florentine series. In the story, we are reunited with Gabriel and Julianne and introduced to a whole new set of enthralling characters. Notably, a mysterious and sinister other worldly being who wants the illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy that Gabriel acquired years ago. Unbeknownst to the professor, the illustrations were stolen. Now their rightful owner wants them back and is out for blood.

Reynard’s Prince is certainty no Prince Charming, even if he has the looks for it. No, he’s more of a Machiavelli prince, a master manipulator, ruthless with little regard for moral justification or the heads he might have to crush. The chasm between good and evil has never been so strongly felt. “It is better to be feared than loved.” Our dark antagonist embodies these words. However, I sense that there is more to The Prince than meets the eye. Perhaps, he wasn’t always so mercurial?

Reynard’s writing style is edgy and sexy. This novella oozes darkness and intrigue. I’m not normally a fan of the paranormal romance genre, but leave it to the sly fox to reel me in. Curse and bless you, Sylvain Reynard. I can’t wait to see what you have in store for us in The Raven.

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The Fox on The Run. Twenty Questions with NY Times Best Selling Author- Sylvain Reynard

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My thanks to SR. I apologizes for the formatting. WordPress is being cankerous. (GRR)

Randomness

1. If you were Alice, would you rather stay in Wonderland on the other side of the mirror, or come back to the real world to tell the tale?
Wonderland would be fascinating but I’d have to return to the real world.
2. Happiness is _____the satisfaction of all our deepest longings.

3. Can we have happiness without sadness? On occasion. But certainly not without marmalade.

4. An author with whom you would like to have lunch? Saul Bellow.

5. If you were a drink. What would you be? Why? A shot of Laphroaig Scotch. Neat.
I’m afraid the only answer to the ‘why’ question I can come up with is rather rude so I’d best leave it unanswered.
6. Once, the movie. Are you familiar with it?
No, I’m sorry to say.
7. Does darkness soothe you or frighten you?
Both. It depends on the kind of darkness and whether I’m carrying something that could be used as a defensive weapon.
8. If you ruled your own country, who would you get to write your national anthem?
JS Bach. Or Sting.
It’s a toss up, really.
9. What makes you nostalgic?
Classic children’s literature.
10. Narnia or Never Land?
Narnia.
11. Do you remember your dreams?
Yes. I dreamt of being a writer, once.
12. What’s your favorite time of day?
Morning, after I’ve had my first coffee.
13. What’s your favorite season?
Autumn.
14. Does pressure motivate you?
It can but it can also demotivate. So a balance needs to be struck. Speaking of which, when I lack demotivation, I turn to this helpful website: http://www.despair.com/demotivators.html
15. Would you rather live to write or write to live?
Live to write.
16. What published book do you secretly wish you had written?
The Brothers Karamazov.
17. Are you the paranoid type or calm, cool and collected?
Oh, I’m definitely paranoid. (Looks over shoulder)
Technically, one is not paranoid if there really are people who are trying to get you.
18. What would qualify as the afternoon of your dreams?
To spend the day in Florence at the Uffizi Gallery and then dine in a piazza.
19. Are you more like the sun or the moon?
Moon.
20. Do you hear voices?
Frequently.
They swear a lot.
Please tell our readers about your upcoming projects.

Thank you for inviting me to answer 20 questions and thanks for asking about my projects.

I have a new series coming out, which is set in the underworld of Florence. The first work, “The Prince,” is a novella that links the Gabriel Series with the new series. “The Prince” releases January 20th

http://www.amazon.com/Prince-Gabriels-Inferno-Florentine-Novella-ebook/dp/B00NUMIOY4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415028778&sr=8-1&keywords=the+prince+sylvain+reynard

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Then “The Raven,” which is the first novel in the new series, releases February 3rd.

http://www.amazon.com/Raven-Florentine-Book-1-ebook/dp/B00KWG9JL8/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1415028884&sr=1-2&keywords=the+prince+sylvain+reynard

the-raven

 

Cover Reveal: The Raven by Sylvain Reynard

From the author of the Gabriel’s Inferno saga, Sylvain Reyanard comes a new trilogy “The Raven” a paranormal romance that will make you fall in love with Reynard’s writing all over again. We at La Literati are proud to be part of the cover reveal for this amazing new series.

And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted—nevermore!

-Edgar Allen Poe

 

Cover Reveal
The Raven by Sylvain Reynard
May 27, 2014

The Raven 
by Sylvain Reynard
 
Blurb: 
From the New York Times bestselling author of the Gabriel Series comes a dark, sensual tale of romance in a city shrouded in mystery…
Raven Wood spends her days at Florence’s Uffizi Gallery restoring fine works of Renaissance art. But an innocent walk home after an evening with friends changes her life forever. When she intervenes in the senseless beating of a homeless man, his attackers turn on her, dragging her into an alley. Raven is only semi-conscious when their assault is interrupted by a cacophony of growls followed by her attacker’s screams. Mercifully, she blacks out, but not before catching a glimpse of a shadowy figure who whispers to her…
Cassita vulneratus.
When Raven awakes, she is inexplicably changed. She returns to the Uffizi, but no one recognizes her and more disturbingly, she discovers that she’s been absent an entire week. With no recollection of the events leading up to her disappearance, Raven also learns that her absence coincides with one of the largest robberies in Uffizi history – the theft of a set of priceless Botticelli illustrations. When the baffled police force identifies her as its prime suspect, Raven is desperate to clear her name. She seeks out one of Florence’s wealthiest and elusive men in an attempt to uncover the truth about her disappearance. Their encounter leads Raven to a dark underworld whose inhabitants kill to keep their secrets…
Release Date:
Early 2015
About the Author
I’m interested in the way literature can help us explore aspects of the human condition – particularly suffering, sex, love, faith, and redemption. My favourite stories are those in which a character takes a journey, either a physical journey to a new and exciting place, or a personal journey in which he or she learns something about himself/herself.
I’m also interested in how aesthetic elements such as art, architecture, and music can be used to tell a story or to illuminate the traits of a particular character. In my writing, I combine all of these elements with the themes of redemption, forgiveness, and the transformative power of goodness.
I try to use my platform as an author to raise awareness about the following charities: Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep Foundation, WorldVision, Alex’s Lemonade Stand, and Covenant House. For more information, see my Twitter account.
You can find Sylvain at
         

 

Twenty Questions with New York Times Best Selling Author- Sylvain Reynard

Sylvain Reynard, author of the Gabriel’s Inferno Trilogy and the upcoming paranormal romance The Raven, was kind enough to answers twenty random questions, posed by yours truly. In addition to being a good sport, an amazing author and a friend to humanity, Reynard has a stellar sense of humor. Check it out. And, be sure to check him out at. http://www.sylvainreynard.com/

1. If you were going to write an article about yourself, what would the headline be?

Anonymous Author Writes Article About Anonymity.

2. Describe your current mood using a color?

Amber.

3. What’s the theme song of your life?

The Long and Winding Road by the Beatles.

4. Do you take selfies? If so, care to share? 😉

I don’t. I have been known to photobomb, however.

5. Favorite sound. Least favorite sound?

Laughter.
My alarm clock.

6. What’s your favorite SR quote?

“Kindness is never wasted.”

7. What was the last film you saw?

Noah.

8. Do you sing in the shower?

Badly.

9. If you could change anything about yourself, what would it be?

I wish I were more patient.

10. Can you impersonate anyone famous?

I’m really good at impersonating anonymous authors, especially at parties.

11. Describe your dream sandwich.

There’s a sandwich shop in England called Prêt a Manger. https://www.pret.com

I enjoy almost all their sandwiches and could eat their daily. Their Ham & Cheese Baguette is my favourite.

12. What’s your favorite smell/scent?

I like the smell of coffee and oranges.

13. What was your first car?

A horse and buggy, actually.

14. How old were you were you discovered your love for writing?

I can’t remember, but I was writing with crayons…

15. If you could be any fictional character, who would you be? Why?

I’d like to be an elf from the woodland realm, as described by Tolkien.
http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/Woodland_Realm

16. Innie or outie?

Pardon?

17. Clowns. Creepy or cool?

Not really a fan of clowns …

18. What your favorite poem?

“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost

19. Do you prefer ponytails or pigtails?

(Sigh)

20. Tell us about your upcoming novel?

Thank you.

I’m writing “The Raven,” which is the first in a new series. It’s a paranormal love story set in Florence, Italy, and it will feature a cameo with the Professor. It’s possible other characters from The Gabriel Series will also appear …

Here’s the description:

From the New York Times bestselling author of the Gabriel Series comes a dark, sensual tale of romance in a city shrouded in mystery…

Raven Wood spends her days at Florence’s Uffizi Gallery restoring fine works of Renaissance art. But an innocent walk home after an evening with friends changes her life forever. When she intervenes in the senseless beating of a homeless man, his attackers turn on her, dragging her into an alley. Raven is only semi-conscious when their assault is interrupted by a cacophony of growls followed by her attacker’s screams. Mercifully, she blacks out, but not before catching a glimpse of a shadowy figure who whispers to her …

Cassita vulneratus.

When Raven awakes, she is inexplicably changed. She returns to the Uffizi, but no one recognizes her and more disturbingly, she discovers that she’s been absent an entire week. With no recollection of the events leading up to her disappearance, Raven also learns that her absence coincides with one of the largest robberies in Uffizi history – the theft of a set of priceless Botticelli illustrations. When the baffled police force identifies her as its prime suspect, Raven is desperate to clear her name. She seeks out one of Florence’s wealthiest and elusive men in an attempt to uncover the truth about her disappearance. Their encounter leads Raven to a dark underworld whose inhabitants kill to keep their secrets …

I have a cover design and a release date for “The Raven,” but we haven’t announced them yet. Look for an announcement soon.

Thanks again Tosha for inviting me to join you and your readers.
It’s a pleasure,
SR

The Fox Who? A Night with the Snarky Narrator from Gabriel’s Inferno

Disclaimer: the narrative is pure fiction. The letters that follow are very real and from readers who wanted to express their appreciation for the Snarky Narrator and Sylvain Reynard. My thanks goes out to “both” for indulging my tom foolery or perhaps tolerating is a better word.:)
To learn more about The Snarky Narrator, Sylvain Reyanrd and their latest work, The Raven, .please go here.
http://www.sylvainreynard.com/
Please feel free to scroll down to the good part where SN steals the show. He does not disappoint.
The Fox Who? A Night with the Snarky Narrator
A few weeks back I had the pleasure of interviewing Sylvain Reynard, the author of the Gabriel’s Inferno trilogy. The series is a must-read, by the way. Reynard was delightful and most accommodating. I’m in awe of his word-building expertise. We met for coffee and had a lively discussion about the characters in his novels. Lovely guy, but still all throughout the interview my mind kept wandering to another man deeply rooted in Gabriel’s Inferno saga; a man who knows his way around parenthesis and a turn of phrase; a man so witty, so intriguing that even The Most Interesting Man in the World pales in comparison; a man known only as the Snarky Narrator. I, myself, being a long-time proponent of snark and a lifetime user of parentheses, knew I had to meet him. Could Reynard be my in with Mr. Snarky Pants? Would he introduce a girl to the snark of her dreams? As our interview was coming to an end, I casually dropped the Snarky one’s name in hopes Reynard would take the hint. He merely scoffed it off and excused himself to the men’s room. That was the last I saw of the kind one. He did pay our tab and left a note that read “O’Malley on 53rd Street, at midnight, come alone, wear a beret and ask for Pepé Le Pew” (Mon Dieu!)

Later that night dressed in a hounds tooth sheath, black leather high heels boots and a friggin’ beret (which I hope screamed of understated elegance), I found myself walking down a dark alley in search of O’Malley’s. It was pitch dark, aside from one flickering street lamp. The whole area gave out a creepy, Jack the Ripper vibe. Was this the Reynard’s idea of a joke? To add to my woes, my feet were killing me, and I’d already tripped twice. High heels be damned. I was cursing Reynard, The Snarky Narrator, and his blasted parentheses; mumbling to myself about mysterious authors and their snotty neighbor when I spotted a sign for O’ Malley’s and a tall leggy redhead who looked like she stepped out of Vogue magazine, standing guard at the door. I would like to say I sauntered over to her. But it was more of a step, trip, step. She gave me the once over and clearly found me lacking. In a bored voice she said, “How can I help you?”

Feeling foolish, I mumbled, “I’m here to see Pepé Le Pew.” She laughed, rolled her eyes and told me to follow her. She led me down a long, dark, narrow hallway, and again I found myself questioning just what Reynard had gotten me into. I was so busy imagining my impending doom that I ran slap dab into the back of Red who had come to a stop. Apparently we had reached our destination. Doing my best impression of a Von Trapp singing the Cuckoo Cuckoo song, I looked around her and saw the most gorgeous, hunk of male standing behind the bar. Ladies, I would love to describe him to you, but there are no words to convey the depths of his beauty. I was speechless. He winked at me, asked Red to give us a few, and offered me a drink of my choosing. Of course I said something lame like when choosing my poison, I always opt for Diet Dr. Pepper straight up and on the rocks. He just smiled and poured me a cold one. He said, ‘So Reynard sent you here?” I stammered, “Yes, he said to ask for Pepé Le Pew and wear a beret.” At that, the Adonis threw his head back and laughed and said, “Reynard has a sense of humor after all. Allow me to introduce myself, I’m the Snarky Narrator, but you can call me SN, my dear. I hear you have some questions for me, pull up a bar stool and let’s have a chat, shall we”?

Now folks, I would like to tell you that I wowed the Snarky Narrator with my sassy snark; that he was blown away by my Southern charm and sweet social graces. However, when confronted with Snark excellence, my false bravado went out the window. All I could do was stare like a starry-eyed teenager mooning over her first crush. My inner sassy snark was screaming at me, “Get it together, woman!” But my 16-year-old self was drowning her out with, “He’s so hot!” (Apparently, my 16-year-old self isn’t very articulate). Luckily for me, I had come prepared. I always get by with a little help from my friends. A group of women I like to call Reynard’s Angels had given me notes and questions to ask SN. I passed the notes over and watched and listened in awe as he read and answered the questions. (This is where reality kicks in. The following are actual letters from some of the kindest women on the planet)

__________________________________

“My Dear Sexy SN, thank you for answering some questions for us. You’re so kind.
You have become quite popular with the ladies. How does SR feel about this? Has he said anything about your story? If so, who would narrate it?
Thank you. Some people have trouble sharing the spotlight … I think readers enjoyed my narration and that’s why they’ve responding so well.
If my story were to be told I’d have to narrate it myself. I couldn’t leave a tale like that to SR.

In Chapter 35 in Redemption, the Emersons encountered at the Uffizi a young, fair-haired man with strange gray eyes who spoke to them about the Botticelli’s illustrations with irony. He seemed very mysterious. Gabriel asks Julia to stay away from him… Do you know who this man was? Is he perhaps someone we’ll see in The Raven?
Yes, I know who he is. But I can’t tell you. You’ll have to bribe me

Btw, that chocolate body paint is still waiting.”
This sounds like an excellent tool for bribing. I’m interested …
Yours,
Schedar
______________________________________
Dear SN,
In my opinion, the parentheses on SR books are masterpieces! I think you are genial, intelligent, beautiful, charming and your words are the touch of humor in SR’s books. But you need to know, there are rumors that you are a character from the SR’s books. A privileged character. What you have to say about it?
Thank you Renata. There are lots of “characters” in my apartment building, but trust me, I’m not one of them. I’m the narrator.
You think being a SR’s neighbor may have been a predominant factor for you to work with him in the books? How is work with SR? Have you thought about going solo? Your comic timing is wonderful!
In the beginning I was just trying to help SR out. But now I think it’s clear that I need to tell my own story.

Renata.
____________________________________________

Dear SN,
Thanks so much for answering our questions, while your snarky character is just adored; your kind generosity is also commended.
My questions to you are:
One
The Raven will make the fourth novel by SR you have narrated, for budding storytellers aspiring to the ultimate ‘ Snarky Narrator’ status, do you have any words of wisdom you would like to share?
Never trust a thin chef.
Two
You recently said in a ‘Bookish Temptation’ interview (December 1, 2013) that you were about to become a model for Calvin Klein. As a self confessed Henry Cavill look- a-like, one can only imagine that business must be ’blooming’ I mean ‘booming’. Is this working out for you and has your ‘snarky edge’ been an advantage?
When Henry Cavill and David Gandy weren’t available, I was the obvious choice. (Even though I don’t wear underwear in real life)
The SR twitter account is a delight to visit; the tweets are always charming, positive, supportive & sometimes hilariously funny. The expressed charity and kindness from SR and his readers is inspiring and I love to escape the reality of everyday life to chat with like minded SR readers.
May your next adventure be snarkier then the last!
Best Wishes
Kez
________________________________-
SN,
” Je vous adore et si un jour vous voulez venir sur la côte d’azur, je me ferais un plaisir de vous faire la visite :),
Oui, Alexandra. Certainement.
How important is the point of view of a writer?
I think it’s very important. The “voice” of a writer is what the reader hears in his or her head and it should be unique and hopefully, pleasant to listen to. I think that’s why I, as the Snarky Narrator, have garnered so many admirers. Readers love to hear me talk.
-Alexandra
___________________________________________
Hello SN! Thank you so much for your time. Perhaps, we can play some video games after you answer my questions… (Grinning & crossing my fingers.)
I think that a man who is intelligent, have a good sense of humor & cooks is extremely sexy. Do you cook? Any signature dish?
When I cook for myself it’s simple comfort food like chili. I’d never serve it to a date, however. For you, I’d make spaghetti and meatballs … and then we can play Grand Theft Auto.
If you were to take me to a date, were would you take me? (Duck my head blushing & smiling.)
I’d take you to a Botanical Garden so we could admire the beauty together.
Love,
BAE xx
___________________________________________________-
(Cue silly narrative) and then I handed SN one last letter. I watched with nervous anticipation as he began to read.
Dear SN,
I wrote this note just in case the unthinkable happened and I was so overcome by just the snark of you, that I was rendered speechless. I want to thank you for agreeing to this interview and for being the snarkiest of snark. Please give SR my regards, and tell him, Pepé Le Pew and I have a beret full of sugarless gummies with his name on it. If you see the dashing Gabriel, please give him a kiss for me, on the cheek of course, anything else would be unseemly. I do have one question for you. What would you title your memoir?
Snarky: My Years in Captivity.
Stay snarky, hunky and parenthetical.
-Tosha Michelle
Thank you, ladies. It was a pleasure to be with you, SN.

This one goes out to the Snarky Narrator.

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